ANKA MAKOVEC

Technical expertise enables Anka Makovec to employ a variety of approaches. An adventurous creator is not pleased with just one technique, the same motifs or a repetitious approach. Her best results are achieved by using watercolours. This technique, although demanding great dedication, offers good effects. Straddling two different worlds, she discovers and presents the art heritage of both worlds.

Alenka Černelič Krošelj, Lecturer of Art History, Ethnologist and Cultural Anthropologist

 

ANKA was born on 3rd August 1938 at Ročinj, Slovenia and died in February 2017 in Devonport, Tasmania..
“I have participated in the Slovenian church in Merrylands, Sydney, at the time I lived there.
I am retired now.“
Professional Art Training and Art Workshops attended:
    Studio Tony Smibert Deloraine Tas. 4 workshops in creative WATERCOLOR Painting,
    Nigel Lysenbi Art Studio: Watercolor landscapes al fresco, 3 workshops, N. Coast Tas.
    Printing technique, 3 courses at TAFE Devonport, Tasmania
    Painting on silk - 4 workshops at Migrant Resource Centre Devonport with Elena Gallegos from El Salvador - Building Bridges with Refugees.
    Painting with pastels - Workshops with Devonport artists Deborah Conroy and Owen Lade.
Exhibitions entered:
    9 shows at art galleries and other venues on North Coast, Tasmania
    1 Art Gallery Zehan and 1 at Strahan on West Coast, Tasmania    
    One show at Most na Soči, Slovenian immigrants workshop, organized by SIM Ljubljana.

“I have received no major awards
 I love the creative energy of the art.
As a child in Slovenia I had a most encouraging teacher who was a gifted artist himself.
Impressionists always held my fascination: Vincent van Gogh and Ivan Grohar from Slovenia mostly.
Art enriched my daily life beyond belief. It is something we can leave behind for future generations after we die.
I started to paint in oils first, then pastels, pen and ink, acrylics and watercolours. When living in the Outback with Aboriginal artists, I enthusiastically took on their teachings of “Dot and Line” native style.
I learned from the Elders the meaning behind mysterious designs and the associated history. At that time (early 1980s), there was no teacher of this art available in Tasmania, so they asked me to start teaching at schools; from pre-school to colleges, adapting the technique as I went along. I made sure there was someone from the descendants of Tasmanian Aborigines interested in Arts.  All the learning that was passed to me would eventually teach them, and I am proud to say, this happened in a few short years. The credit for these things goes to my dear friend, Aboriginal artist and author Goobalathaldin (Dick Roughsey), who so diligently passed his knowledge to me before he passed away.
But it was watercolours that took over in the end, they are such a challenge to master!
Every teacher has an influence, one way or another, but the magic of Tony Smiberts’ flowing brush strokes in style of old Japanese masters, still guides my hand. I hope I never stop learning and hoping: one day . . ..”
My subject matters are never sophisticated images of city life, abstracts or strange concoctions. Simple country life and everyday objects are my favourites.
I know that if my grandma Martina was still alive, she would approve of my work. And that’s fine with me.”

Anka Makovec

 

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